Walter Williams on the Automaker Bailout

I agree with the concretes in this piece by Walter Williams on the automaker “bailout.” The principle remains, however: it’s a blatant infringement on individual rights and an unconstitutional government intervention into the economy.

That aside, his piece is well worth a read: Bailouts and Bankruptcy:

Let’s not allow Congress and members of the bailout parade panic us into allowing them to do things, as was done in the 1930s, that would convert a mild economic downturn into a true calamity. Right now the Big Three auto companies, and their unions, are asking Congress for a $25 billion bailout to avoid bankruptcy. Let’s think about that a bit.

What happens when a company goes bankrupt? One thing that does not happen is their productive assets go poof and disappear into thin air. In other words, if GM goes bankrupt, the assembly lines, robots, buildings and other tools don’t evaporate. What bankruptcy means is the title to those assets change. People who think they can manage those assets better purchase them.

Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code, where the control of its business operations are subject to the oversight and jurisdiction of the court, gives companies a chance to reorganize. The court can permit complete or partial relief from the company’s debts and its labor union contracts.

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